Top 5 Signs Of Good Oral Health

06 / 03 / 2020

Are you treating your teeth as well as you should? It is vital to have good oral health. Healthy gums allow a strong base for eating and speaking, and good oral health results in less oral-related diseases.

Apart from a decreased risk of oral complications, excellent oral health implies a healthier rest of the body since the body and mouth correlate. And with data from the Australian Government showing dental hygiene has been improving over the past 30 years, there’s no excuse not to have beautiful, clean teeth.

So, how do you identify whether or not you have good oral health?

Prevention is always better than a cure.

Visiting the dentist is one way, but there are other signs of good oral health you should look out for.

Below are a few indicators you have good oral health.

Good Oral Health

Are you treating your teeth as well as you should? It is vital to have good oral health. Healthy gums allow a strong base for eating and speaking, and good oral health results in less oral-related diseases.

Apart from a decreased risk of oral complications, excellent oral health implies a healthier rest of the body since the body and mouth correlate. And with data from the Australian Government showing dental hygiene has been improving over the past 30 years, there’s no excuse not to have beautiful, clean teeth.

So, how do you identify whether or not you have good oral health?

Prevention is always better than a cure.

Visiting the dentist is one way, but there are other signs of good oral health you should look out for.

Below are a few indicators you have good oral health.

1. No bleeding when brushing and flossing

One sign of improperly cared for gums is gums that tend to bleed fast when brushing and flossing. Leaving or ignoring this problem can result in gum disease, as well as other oral-related complications in the future.

That means that when engaging in usual routines of flossing and brushing, your gums should never be finicky or bleed with oral hygiene techniques.

2. Pink Gums

Healthy gums should never be pale or bright red, but rather pink. In other words, bright red gums are a sure sign of poor oral hygiene, which means you have an increased risk of developing gum disease.

On the other hand, pale, white gums might be a sign of anemia and may need to be reviewed by a medical specialist. In either case, the general health of your mouth and gums may need your immediate attention, as gum disease can eventually lead to bone loss and loss of teeth over time.

3. Pleasant Breath

Individuals with excellent oral health will certainly have pleasant-smelling breath.

It is unhealthy to have foul-smelling breath, and this is usually brought about by an overgrowth of oral bacteria, poor oral hygiene, or an underlying oral problem or issue within the body itself.

If you want to stay away from bad breath, you should remain consistent with your twice-a-day flossing, brushing, and rinsing with mouthwash routines. It is also prudent to consider biannual dental cleaning and check up appointments with your dentist.

Bad breath has the ability to cause serious mental health problems when left untreated too, explains Melbourne beautician Connie Di Camillo who explains “I see a handful of young girls every week who enquire about cosmetic procedures to overcome their confidence issues. In many cases small matters of oral hygiene can cause major issues with anxiety and stress. And while larger procedures can be seen as a way to regain confidence, in many cases it is basic dental habits that can help restore a confident smile.”

4. Non-sensitive Teeth

In general, it is not unusual to experience some tooth sensitivity now and then. However, persistent, severe, ongoing, and/or aggravated cases of tooth sensitivity are an absolute concern.

For this reason, these cases demand the attention of a dentist immediately. Apart from the ability of tooth sensitivity to bring about oral pain when consuming sweet, very hot, or cold beverages and foods, its major problem is the fact that it occurs because of deteriorated enamel.

After the enamel is ruined, this exposes the teeth’ nerves leading to sharp pain. However, it’s not only pain that’s a problem; this can result in cavities and other issues in the mouth.

When asked to comment on the number of people with poor oral hygiene, despite the Australian Government releasing figures showing 30 year highs in standards, celebrant Jermaine Clarke had this to say “in my role I work with couples who are thrilled to launch into the next chapter of their lives. But when they feel self-conscious about smiling for photos, or can’t enjoy their meal due to tooth sensitivity, it’s clear a visit to a professional dentist could reap big rewards.”

It is for this reason that a dentist might suggest a tooth sensitivity toothpaste or treatment.

Looking to make your smile stand out? Find out about dental teeth whitening here.

5. The smooth, non-gritty texture on your teeth

If you have a smooth feel on your teeth, it implies that your teeth are getting the right cleaning they require through brushing.

Nevertheless, teeth that have a gritty texture, especially after brushing, indicate improper brushing and lack of oral care. Your teeth should seldom, if ever, have this gritty texture; this is most likely to take place behind the teeth, as well as other difficult-to-reach areas of your mouth.

To avoid this grittiness, make sure that all parts of your teeth are properly brushed. Failure to do this can result in an easy-to-remove plaque becoming harder, more permanent, and a more visible form of plaque, which is commonly called tartar.

Luckily, tartar can and must only be eliminated by a dental expert with special tools. Also, tartar must be removed, or else, it can result in gum disease if left unattended for too long.

Ensure that you get your teeth checked to improve your overall health.

Are you in need of affordable and experienced dental care?

A visit at least two times every year for your biannual teeth cleaning and dental checkup is vital.

Speak to the friendly team at Big Smiles Dental to find out more!

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Written by: Janet Harlow

Great Oral Health